Collected Wisdom

Focus attention, plan activities, stay organized

Category: School Skills

  • Boost Your Executive Functioning in Nine Exciting Ways with ADHD Now!

    We all have strengths and weaknesses in our executive functioning. We can be extremely intelligent and have challenges with executive functioning. Yet, when you live with ADHD and executive functioning challenges, difficulties in one or more executive functions can affect your performance and make it tough for your strengths to shine. Here are nine exciting ways to boost your performance and accomplish what's important to you. 

  • Overcome Time Blindness in Three Masterful Ways and Gain Calm with ADHD

    Do you feel like you’re at war with yourself when it comes to managing your time? Whether you post sticky notes in every nook and cranny, set reminders on all your devices, or ask Alexa for verbal reminders, productive use of time can be unsettling, daunting, and disorienting. Here are three strategies to overcome time blindness so you can have more peace and calm living with ADHD.

  • Beat Overwhelm Back to School: How to Help Your Child with ADHD
    It’s not surprising that last school year's reduced in-person classroom time and online learning may have you currently uneasy about providing adequate academic support for your child. Here are five strategies to get results for your child and some peace of mind for yourself now.
  • Overcome the Burdens of High Achievement and ADHD

    You’re the accomplished, go-to person whom people count on, and just about everyone does. But the piled-up projects, numerous spinning plates, and mounting stress have gotten to be too much. Here are three strategies to assist you in overcoming the burdens of living with high achievement and ADHD.

  • How To Be School-Ready With ADHD

    We do our best as parents and teachers to vigilantly support our students throughout their school years. The challenge is that by the time our kids reach high school, our well-intended support can backfire when our students do not learn skills for themselves. As well-meaning parents, we tend to shield our kids from experiencing failure because it’s painful to watch, as their self-esteem plunges. Our task is to figure out how to best pass the baton onto our kids when the ADHD brain may need more experiences than what is perceived as typical for learning to take place. 

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